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Plants Matching cucurbita

Returned 97 results. Page 1 of 10.

Image of Cucurbita photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Cucurbita)

(Squash)

This sprawling, warm-season annual vine originates from Mesoamerica, from Mexico to Costa Rica. Botanists believe the cushaw squash was first cultivated about 7,000 years ago in southern Mexico. Traditionally the flowers, stems and both immature and mature fruits were eaten. When compared to its close cousins, Cucurbita pepo and C. moschata, the fruits of C. argyrosperma are less flavorful and lower in quality for eating overall but they are decorative.

A diverse...

Image of Cucurbita argyrosperma

Jessie Keith

(Campeche Squash, Squash)

Beautiful fruits that mimic the look of small watermelons, the Campeche squash isn't consumed in like manner, if at all. This sprawling, warm-season annual vine originates from Mesoamerica - from Mexico to Costa Rica. Botanists believe Cucurbita argyrosperma was first cultivated about 7,000 years ago in southern Mexico. Know more commonly as a winter squash, 'Campeche' abundantly produces rounded to slightly teardrop-shaped fruits. The skin is ivory-white, with dark green streaks and netting...

Image of Cucurbita argyrosperma

Jessie Keith

(Green Striped Cushaw Squash, Squash)

The Hopi tribe in the American Southwest regarded crookneck variety 'Green Striped Cushaw' as a reliable winter squash crop for centuries. The sprawling, warm-season annual vine species originates from Mesoamerica - from Mexico to Costa Rica - but was grown by native peoples across the New World. Botanists believe the cushaw squash was first cultivated about 7,000 years ago in southern Mexico.

'Green Striped Cushaw' produces large, 10- to 20-pound (4.5 to 9 kg) fruits. The skin is ivory-white...

Image of Cucurbita argyrosperma

Jessie Keith

(Squash, Survivor Squash)

This sprawling, warm-season annual vine originates from Mesoamerica, from Mexico to Costa Rica. Botanists believe the cushaw squash was first cultivated about 7,000 years ago in southern Mexico. Traditionally the flowers, stems and both immature and mature fruits were eaten. When compared to its close cousins, Cucurbita pepo and C. moschata, the fruits of C. argyrosperma are less flavorful and lower in quality for eating overall but they are decorative.

A diverse...

Image of Cucurbita foetidissima photo by: Audrey, Eve and George DeLange

Audrey, Eve and George DeLange

(Buffalo Gourd, Calabazilla, Chilicote)

Image of Cucurbita maxima photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Pumpkin, Winter Squash)

Originating from South America, winter squash have been cultivated since ancient times by Native American peoples, and are prized today for both their culinary and decorative qualities. Most mature late in the season, and come in a variety of interesting shapes and festive colors.

The rambling stems of these warm season, annual vines bear large, golden yellow, trumpet shaped blossoms. Both male and female flowers appear on the same plant, and are pollinated by bees. The male flowers appear...

Image of Cucurbita maxima

Jessie Keith

(Atlantic Giant Pumpkin, Pumpkin)

The massive ‘Atlantic Giant’ is known to have produced some of the world's largest pumpkins. Usually grown for size, display and competition, the fruits of this heirloom winter squash have sometimes approached 1000 pounds (455 kg), but 400-500 pound (180-225 kg) specimens are much more common. The fruits are rounded to broadly obese and almost lumpy, with light orange to orange-yellow rinds and thick, golden flesh that is also good for cooking. They ripen approximately 120 days from sowing.

...

Image of Cucurbita maxima

Jessie Keith

(Big Max Pumpkin, Pumpkin)

Living up to its name, ‘Big Max’ produces large, rounded pumpkins which can exceed 100 pounds (45 kg) and 70 inches (176 cm) in diameter. The fruits have a bright orange rind surrounding thick, orange-yellow flesh which is good for pies. They are ready for harvest approximately 110 to 120 days from sowing.

Pumpkins and winter squash originate from tropical South America and have been long cultivated by Native Americans. Round, orange types such as 'Big Max' are often called pumpkins, though...

Image of Cucurbita maxima

All-America Selections

(Winter Squash)

Winner of the prestigious All-America Selections award in 2005, hybrid winter squash ‘Bonbon’ bears many squat, blocky, deep green fruits which are larger than most other buttercup types. The tasty, sweet, deep orange flesh is perfect for roasting, mashing or baking. Fruits are borne on vigorous vines approximately 95 days from sowing.

Cultivated since ancient times by Native Americans, winter squash are warm season, annual vines originating from tropical South America. The rambling stems...