Advanced Search Filters

Plant Type
Hardiness Zone
Heat Zone
Sunset Zone
Function
Sun Exposure
Soil Moisture
Water Requirement

Plants Matching pinus

Returned 111 results. Page 1 of 12.

Image of Pinus photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Pine)

Pines are considered to be some of the most economically important plants in the world. Lumber for construction and furniture, resins for turpentine, and wood pulp for paper are all products of commercially valuable pines. There are about 100 species which make up genus Pinus. These evergreen trees, and occasionally shrubs, are distributed across the Northern Hemisphere worldwide. Several species have naturalized in parts of the Southern Hemisphere.

The trunks and stems of these plants...

(Alpine Whitebark Pine, Whitebark Pine)

This small dense evergreen tree comes from high altitudes in western North America. It is closely allied to limber pine (Pinus flexilis), which is sometimes sold under its name.

The stout, deep green to yellow-green needles of this pine are held in bundles of five toward the tips of long flexible branches. The needles have conspicuous white lines on their upper surface. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and large scaly female cones on the previous year's growth. The egg-shaped,...

Image of Pinus albicaulis

Mark A. Miller

(Blue-needled Whitebark Pine, Whitebark Pine)

This small dense evergreen tree comes from high altitudes in western North America. It is closely allied to limber pine (Pinus flexilis), which is sometimes sold under its name.

The stout, deep green to yellow-green needles of this pine are held in bundles of five toward the tips of long flexible branches. The needles have conspicuous white lines on their upper surface. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and large scaly female cones on the previous year's growth. The egg-shaped,...

Image of Pinus aristata photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Bristlecone Pine)

This small, very long-lived and slow-growing pine is perfectly adapted to dry, high altitude mountain communities throughout the western United States where soils are thin and moisture scant. A native of the high country of western Colorado, northern New Mexico, and northern Arizona, it is best known for its very long lifespan and the twisted, gnarled form of older specimens. Some specimens are more than 2000 years old. The most ancient bristlecone trees (approaching 5000 years old) belong to Pinus...

Image of Pinus aristata

James H. Schutte

(Bristlecone Pine)

An exceedingly slow-growing, dense, conical selection of bristlecone pine, this cultivar was introduced by Sherwood Nursery, Portland, Oregon. It may be a selection of Pinus longaeva.

The stubby, stiff needles of this dwarf cultivar are borne in bundles of five that remain on the plant for many years, forming dense bottlebrush-like clusters at the ends of the branches. The foliage lacks the resinous white flecks typical of P. aristata. This cultivar grows extremely...

Image of Pinus armandii photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Armand Pine, Chinese White Pine)

This medium-sized evergreen tree from Asian uplands is notable for its long, handsome pine needles and cones. It occurs primarily in western and central China, with scattered populations in other parts of Asia.

The long, supple, bright green needles of this pine are held in bundles of five. The needles sometimes droop, creating a cascading effect. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and long slender female cones on the previous year's growth. The clustered, pendent female cones are...

(Ayacahuite Pine, Mexican White Pine)

This medium to large evergreen tree from uplands of Central American bears long needles and large cones that resemble those of its famous North American relative, Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus).

The thin, supple, bluish green needles of this pine are held in bundles of five. The needles sometimes droop, creating a cascading effect. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and large cylindrical female cones on the previous year's growth. The clustered, pendent female cones are...

Image of Pinus banksiana photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Jack Pine)

Valued for its hardiness and toughness, this small, often shrubby evergreen tree occurs over much of northern North America.

The short, stiff, medium- to dark-green needles of this pine are held in bundles of two. The needles are typically curved and twisted. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and curved, asymmetrical female cones on the previous year's growth. The female cones are covered with fleshy green scales that become woody and yellowish brown as they mature. The scales eventually...

Image of Pinus banksiana

Mark A. Miller

(Jack Pine, Teddy Kreuger Jack Pine)

Valued for its hardiness and toughness, this small, often shrubby evergreen tree occurs over much of northern North America.

The short, stiff, medium- to dark-green needles of this pine are held in bundles of two. The needles are typically curved and twisted. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and curved, asymmetrical female cones on the previous year's growth. The female cones are covered with fleshy green scales that become woody and yellowish brown as they mature. The scales eventually...

(Calabrian Pine)

Most often represented in gardens by its drought-tolerant variety eldarica, this medium-sized evergreen tree comes from the eastern Mediterranean region.

The long, stiff, bright green needles of this pine occur in bundles of two. The needles crowd the outer branches, forming a dense crown. In spring, tiny male cones and larger female cones appear near the branch tips. The female cones - which diverge at right angles from the branches - persist for two years, ripening from green to...