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Plants Matching pinus

Returned 111 results. Page 5 of 12.

Image of Pinus halepensis photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Aleppo Pine)

A Mediterranean native valued for its exceptional heat- and drought-tolerance, this medium-sized evergreen tree is often planted in California and the Southwest United States.

The short, bright green needles of this pine occur in bundles of two. They are rather sparsely borne on short upright branches which form an open, rounded, irregular crown. In spring, tiny male cones and larger female cones appear near the branch tips. The egg-shaped, yellowish brown female cones angle backward from...

(Bosnian Pine, Heldreich Pine )

A close relative of Bosnian pine, this slow-growing evergreen tree is prized for its toughness and beauty. It is native to the Balkans.

This dense, sometimes shrubby pine bears long, rigid, sharp, medium- to dark-green needles in bundles of two. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and oblong, egg-shaped female cones on the previous year's growth. The female cones are covered with purple scales that turn woody and yellowish brown as they mature. In their second year, female cones open their...

Image of Pinus heldreichii

Mark A. Miller

(Bosnian Pine, Green Bun Bosnian Pine)

This dwarf cultivar of the Balkan native Pinus heldreichii slowly forms a dense domed to conical mound of dark green needles.

This diminutive pine bears long, rigid, sharp, dark green needles in bundles of two. It slowly forms a medium-sized, rounded to conical shrub with closely spaced, upright branches.

Heldreich pine does best in ample sun and moist, well-drained, acidic to alkaline soil. Its tolerance of salt spray makes it a great selection for seaside landscapes. This beautiful...

Image of Pinus x holfordiana photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Holford Pine)

Originating in Westonbirt Arboretum more than 100 years ago, this medium to large evergreen tree is a hybrid of two species noted for their long, elegant, weeping needles: Mexican white pine (Pinus ayacahuite) and Himalayan pine (P. wallichiana).

The airy, drooping silver-green needles of this pine occur in bundles of five. The cascading needles shimmer in the slightest breeze. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and long curving female cones near the branch...

Image of Pinus jeffreyi photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Jeffrey's Pine)

This alpine pine is among the toughest mountain species of the American West. Its range extends from southern Oregon to California, Nevada and even into Baja California. Though its extreme adaptability allows it to survive at lower elevations, these trees are not tolerant of air pollution. In urban areas Jeffrey's pine will grow weak over time and become more susceptible to pests and diseases, so it is best grown at higher elevations where temperatures are cooler and summer moisture more plentiful.

Jeffrey's...

Image of Pinus koraiensis photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Korean Pine)

This handsome but under-utilized pine from eastern Asia slowly forms a dense, somewhat conical, medium-sized tree.

The long, rather stout, dark-green to blue-green needles of this hardy evergreen conifer occur in bundles of five on fuzzy reddish-brown branchlets. In spring, trees produce tiny male and larger female cones near the branch tips. The erect, conical to ovoid female cones are green maturing to brown. They ripen their second year, falling from the tree without releasing their large...

Image of Pinus lambertiana photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Shake Pine, Sugar Pine)

Renowned for its mammoth cones, this evergreen tree grows to gargantuan heights in its native haunts in the western North American mountains. In cultivation it is typically of more modest size.

The long, blue-green needles of this pine occur in bundles of five on horizontal to slightly drooping branches. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and enormous cylindrical female cones near the branch tips. The solitary or clustered female cones are sheathed with fleshy green scales that turn...

Image of Pinus leucodermis photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Bosnian Pine)

Bosnian pine is a lovely, symmetrical, slow-growing, evergreen tree, prized for urban sites. It is among the most commonly-used evergreens in cities and gardens of Europe. It is native to the Balkans and much of the Mediterranean region, growing in a wide range of very well-drained soils. This pine when young grows as a quite symmetrical, pointed sapling with well-anchored branching. Its form rounds out as the tree reaches maturity, revealing a beautiful layered structure. Short, very-stiff, dark-green...

Image of Pinus longaeva photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Bristlecone Pine, Great Basin Bristlecone Pine)

Formerly considered a subspecies of bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), this small, slow-growing evergreen tree from the high country of Utah, Nevada, and eastern California is noted for its picturesque, gnarled form and its extraordinary longevity. Specimens of approximately 5000 years are known. Plants bear short, stiff, medium-green to yellow-green needles in bunches of five. The needles persist for many years, forming long dense brushy clusters at the ends of the horizontal to pendent...

Image of Pinus montezumae photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Montezuma Pine)

A majestic evergreen tree with a massive trunk and a dense crown of long elegant drooping needles, this five-needled pine from the mountains of Mexico and Central America is considerably hardier than its tropical origins would suggest.

The long, plumy, blue-green needles of this lofty pine occur in bundles of five on stiff, stout reddish-brown branchlets. In spring, trees produce tiny male cones and large conical to ovoid female cones near the branch tips. The female cones are sheathed with...