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Plants Matching prunus avium

Returned 12 results. Page 1 of 2.

Image of Prunus avium photo by: Bosh Bruening

Bosh Bruening

(Sweet Cherry)

This sweet cherry is among the most universally enjoyed of all tree fruits. It is believed to have originated from a region between the Black and Caspian Seas in Asia Minor. The Greeks and Romans popularized the fruits through heavy cultivation and planted the trees throughout their ancient empires. Continued European cultivation inspired more refined selection and eventually breeding. American colonists introduced sweet cherries to the New World early on and the trees were brought westward to the...

Image of Prunus avium

Nancy Engel

(Bing Cherry, Sweet Cherry)

This is America’s favorite variety for both commercial orchards and home gardens. It is famed for huge yields and delightfully sweet fruit on easy to grow, vigorous trees. The Bing cherry was bred in Washington State and thrives especially well in the Pacific Northwest.

Sweet cherry trees are large and deciduous. Their thick canopies become covered with deep green shiny serrated leaves during the growing season. In spring, the trees burst into heavy bloom, bearing clusters of sweetly scented...

(Black Tartarian Cherry, Sweet Cherry)

This very old variety bears some of the darkest red cherries with super sweet rich flavor. Unlike many other sweet cherries bred in North America, this is a Russian variety that has remained unchanged for centuries. It is famed for huge yields and delightfully sweet fruit on easy to grow, vigorous trees.

Sweet cherry trees are large and deciduous. Their thick canopies become covered with deep green shiny serrated leaves during the growing season. In spring, the trees burst into heavy bloom,...

(Sweet Cherry)

This self-fruitful cherry may be the very best choice for backyard gardens because it does not need a second tree to set fruit. It is a hybrid between the wildly popular ‘Bing’ and lesser known ‘Stella’ and was bred in Modesto, California. This spreading deciduous tree is a natural semi-dwarf, another quality that makes it perfect for the suburban home landscape.

The thick canopy of 'Craig’s Crimson’ is covered with deep green shiny serrated leaves during the growing season. In spring, it bursts...

(Sweet Cherry)

This cherry tree is favored by commercial growers in Oregon due to its heavy crops and later ripening. Its fruit is large, black and most often used for cooking. ‘Lambert’ is of unknown origin but rivals ‘Bing’ in flavor. This spreading deciduous tree is handsome in every way from the ornamental dark to shiny, toothed leaves and profuse spring bloom. It is a smaller form best suited as a flowering accent in the landscape with a bonus of sweet fruit.

The thick canopy of ‘Lambert’ is covered with...

(Sweet Cherry)

This may be the most exciting backyard cherry in America! It packs three punches: a self-fruitful nature, black sweet cherries and a naturally small stature. ‘Lapins’ was developed by the breeder of the most famous sweet cherry for canning, ‘Stella.’ Its sweet dark cherries also resist splitting.

Deep green, shiny, serrated leaves cover the canopy of this tree throughout the growing season. In spring, it bursts into heavy bloom with clusters of sweetly scented white flowers that are five-petaled,...

Image of Prunus avium

Jesse Saylor

(Sweet Cherry)

This sweet cherry is among the most universally enjoyed of all tree fruits. It is believed to have originated from a region between the Black and Caspian Seas in Asia Minor. The Greeks and Romans popularized the fruits through heavy cultivation and planted the trees throughout their ancient empires. Continued European cultivation inspired more refined selection and eventually breeding. American colonists introduced sweet cherries to the New World early on and the trees were brought westward to the...

Image of Prunus avium

Jesse Saylor

(Sweet Cherry)

These cherries are literally the cream of the crop when it comes to beauty and flavor. The yellow-fleshed ‘Rainier’ cherries cost so much to buy at the market, they’re worth the effort to grow, though they can be devilishly difficult to culture outside of the Pacific Northwest. This exceptional semi-dwarf cherry was developed at Washington State University as a cross between ‘Van’ and ‘Bing’, the two most widely cultivated commercial cherries. It has larger fruit than ‘Bing’, creamy yellow flesh...

Image of Prunus avium

John Rickard

(Sweet Cherry)

The yellow flesh cherry ‘Royal Ann’ is primarily grown for the Maraschino cherry industry but many consider its fruit very similar to that of ‘Rainier.’ It us actually an old French variety, formerly known as ‘Napoleon’, that was brought west with immigrants who later cultivated it locally and renamed it. The semi-dwarf trees proved tough and hardy enough for the Oregon frontier.

Deep green, shiny, serrated leaves cover the canopy of this tree throughout the growing season. In spring, it bursts...

Image of Prunus avium

Willis Orchard Co.

(Sweet Cherry)

This was among the very first self-fertile sweet cherry cultivars developed, meaning it does not need a second tree to set fruit. Naturally, 'Stella' quickly became popular in both commercial and home orchards. It is known for abundant yields of delightfully sweet fruit on easy to grow, vigorous, compact trees.

Deep green, shiny, serrated leaves cover the canopy of this tree throughout the growing season. In spring, it bursts into heavy bloom with clusters of sweetly scented white flowers...