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Plants Matching tillandsia

Returned 18 results. Page 1 of 2.

Image of Tillandsia photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Air Plant, Airplant)

The genus Tillandsia was named by Carolus Linnaeus to honor Dr. Elias Tillands, a Finno-Swedish botanist who reportedly had an irrational fear of water. It was once thought these largely tree-dwelling bromeliads also disliked water but this was later found to be inaccurate. There are about 550 species of Tillandsia. They are naturally distributed across the subtropical and tropical regions of the Americas and dwell in various ecosystems from deserts to forests and mountains.

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Image of Tillandsia bulbosa photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Bulbous Air Plant, Dancing Bulb)

The bulbous airplant develops a rosy pink blush on its curvaceous leaves before the purple flowers appear in spring. This frost tender evergreen bromeliad hails from southern Mexico and the West Indies southward into northern South America. Native populations also exist in the most southerly reaches of Florida. It is an epiphyte, which means its tiny roots attach to other plants for support. In the wild, it exist in thin, drier canopies of lowland forests, and the curious onion-like bulbous base...

(Capitate Air Plant)

The bright red and purple flowers of this stunning semi-epiphytic Tillandsia are stunning. Its rosettes of elongated, sword-shaped leaves are dense and may be found growing on trees or along the ground where its native in Mexico, Honduras or Cuba. The leaves are pale green to gray-green and may develop a reddish flush as rosettes prepare to bloom. Flowering occurs in late spring or early summer when growing conditions are at their best.

Grow in full to partial sun and provide regular...

Image of Tillandsia cyanea photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Linden's Air Plant, Pink Quill)

The arching, stiff green to gray-green leaves of this Ecuadorian air plant form handsome rosettes. Pink quill is named for its clusters of pink crested floral bracts that bear brilliant purple flowers. Like most tillandsias, it is an evergreen perennial and epiphyte (tree grower).

The narrow, lance-shaped leaves of pink quill arch gently and form a neat rosette. Around the spring and fall equinoxes, it will send up one or two flower stems topped with a dense cluster of bracts (petal-like leaves)...

Image of Tillandsia edithae photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Bolivian Cliff Air Plant)

The genus Tillandsia was named by Carolus Linnaeus to honor Dr. Elias Tillands, a Finno-Swedish botanist who reportedly had an irrational fear of water. It was once thought these largely tree-dwelling bromeliads also disliked water but this was later found to be inaccurate. There are about 550 species of Tillandsia. They are naturally distributed across the subtropical and tropical regions of the Americas and dwell in various ecosystems from deserts to forests and mountains.

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Image of Tillandsia filifolia photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Threadleaf Air Plant)

The soft, silvery green, filament-like leaves of threadleaf air plant are made more beautiful by its delicate spring flowers. Native to the mid-elevations of southern Mexico and Central America, this frost-tender perennial bromeliad is an epiphyte (grows upon another plant for support). It naturally inhabits tropical forests and only requires moderate humidity for good growth.

Threadleaf air plant forms a central rosette of thread-like, light green leaves that extend outward in a radial display....

Image of Tillandsia harrisii photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Harris' Air Plant)

The genus Tillandsia was named by Carolus Linnaeus to honor Dr. Elias Tillands, a Finno-Swedish botanist who reportedly had an irrational fear of water. It was once thought these largely tree-dwelling bromeliads also disliked water but this was later found to be inaccurate. There are about 550 species of Tillandsia. They are naturally distributed across the subtropical and tropical regions of the Americas and dwell in various ecosystems from deserts to forests and mountains.

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Image of Tillandsia ionantha photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Sky Plant, Violet-flowered Air Plant)

Sky plant is a miniature bromeliad native to forested regions from Mexico and Central America. It is an epiphyte, which means it grows in the upper branches of trees where it receives some sun.

Its pointed, lance-shaped leaves are round in circumference and crowd together to form dense rosettes. They are covered with gray-green, tiny, shield-shaped hairs (trichomes) which collect water and nutrients for the plant and give it a dusty appearance. When the plant is ready to flower in winter or...

Image of Tillandsia ixioides photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Bolivian Forest Air Plant)

The genus Tillandsia was named by Carolus Linnaeus to honor Dr. Elias Tillands, a Finno-Swedish botanist who reportedly had an irrational fear of water. It was once thought these largely tree-dwelling bromeliads also disliked water but this was later found to be inaccurate. There are about 550 species of Tillandsia. They are naturally distributed across the subtropical and tropical regions of the Americas and dwell in various ecosystems from deserts to forests and mountains.

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Image of Tillandsia loliacea photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Air Plant)

The genus Tillandsia was named by Carolus Linnaeus to honor Dr. Elias Tillands, a Finno-Swedish botanist who reportedly had an irrational fear of water. It was once thought these largely tree-dwelling bromeliads also disliked water but this was later found to be inaccurate. There are about 550 species of Tillandsia. They are naturally distributed across the subtropical and tropical regions of the Americas and dwell in various ecosystems from deserts to forests and mountains.

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